Your Online Authority

Become an online authority, Medical Marketing Enterprises, LLCReaders naturally search for an authority.  Authorities have the most credibility.  Your goal is to become a medical authority….online.

Every Website Must Provide Value

Every website must provide value.  Contrary to popular belief, most people are surfing the Internet with a specific purpose.  They are in search of an answer to a question or solution to a problem (really the same thing).

Remember the 3 types of websites?  Resource, Marketing and Interactive.   Regardless of the type of website you have, your website already provides value.  For instance, a basic “resource” site containing hours of operation, insurance information and directions provides value to your existing patients who know they can find this type of information on your site.

To improve your value and to turn your site into a powerful marketing tool, write articles on your site to answer your patients’ questions and solve their problems.  This is the best way your site can provide value and to rank you highly at the same time.

Value Breeds Trust

The more value you provide, and for free, the more trust you will develop.

Trust in you does not develop with one article.  It builds after several articles and over time.  Trust allows patients to leave comments and ask questions on your site.  Trust motivates “readers” to become real patients.

Credibility and Authority

Your degree gives you a certain level of credibility, hence, it will be easier and faster for you to develop trust compared to those without a degree.  You are, therefore, able to provide tremendous value to your readers by sharing your knowledge as an authority.

Remember, who else would be better to provide health information than you?

What Can You Do?

Don’t advertise.  Prove your authority and develop your trust by writing consistently and regularly.  It’s no different than educating our patients in an office setting.  Writing knowledgeably about what you do will provide tremendous value to your future patients.  Providing credible information establishes your authority and will accelerate the development of trust.

To Your Growth And Success!

Randy

Randall V. Wong, M.D.
Medical Website Optimization

www.MedicalMarketingEnterprises.com

 

 

How to Blog Effectively

Learn to Blog From Comedians.  Randall Wong, M.D., Medical Marketing Enterprises, LLCI learned how to blog from comedians.  Comedians taught me the basic steps to writing articles for my blog.  It was easy.

Listening to  the comedy channel on XM radio gave me confidence and taught me a framework for learning to copy-write (i.e. writing blogposts).  While they technically didn’t invent blogging, I found the process to be the same.

Joke vs. Post

Comedians write jokes, we create posts, or articles.  Both start with a concept which must be refined for a specific audience.  The comic will rehearse to maximize the impact of the punch line while the copywriter will rewrite and edit her article hoping to convey her message in a clear, concise manner.

I usually write the rough copy as fast as I think of my points, not taking time to spell check or even write in complete sentences.  I’ll rewrite to expand some ideas and cut out the repetitive, meaningless words.  Subheadings come last.  When I get stuck, I’ll work on something else.  There is a process, and just like a great joke, a great article shouldn’t be rushed.

When ready, the comedian incorporates the joke in a new routine.  So, too, the blogger “publishes” her article.

Speak to One Audience

No joke is funny to everyone., just as your post will not resonate with all of your readers.  Just as you may laugh at a joke, the person sitting next to you may not.  With the next joke, however, the reverse may happen…she laughs and you don’t.

Jokes create laughter, blog posts answer questions or solve problems (e.g. “How do I….?).

Your articles should answer one question or solve one problem at a time.  Doing so, will allow you to be most relevant to those with that same exact problem.  It’s too hard to write an answer for several problems at the same time.  You’ll lose relevance.

Some articles will work, some won’t.  You can not appeal to everyone.

As the comedian can not tell more than one joke at a time, your articles should be focused on one answer at a time.  One post should contain one message.

Becoming a Fan

Every comedian has hundreds of jokes in her arsenal, just as a blogger has many posts (articles).

Building a following for your blog is the same as listening to a comedian run through her routine.  You’ll like some of the jokes and your neighbor likes others, but you both become a fan as, overall, the jokes are funny and appreciated by both of you.

With time, your articles will reflect your attitudes, views and your style.  People who like your style become your fans and will begin to follow you.

Feedback

Feedback is important, too.  A comic gets immediate feedback from laughter.  We get feedback from analytics and the comments left on our website.

Just as a comedian drops bad jokes from her routine.  Use analytics to determine what type of articles work and don’t work for your audience.  Write additional or related articles to those that work.  Drop what doesn’t work.

 

To Your Growth And Success!

Randy

Randall V. Wong, M.D.
Medical Website Optimization

www.MedicalMarketingEnterprises.com

 

 

Your Website Should Be “Under Construction”

Medical marketing enterprises.  Every great website should be under constructionEvery great website should always be “under construction.”  Of the three types of sites;  resource, marketing and interactive, only the resource site is ever really finished.

And you know I’m not talking about web design.

Great websites must remain dynamic whether by adding a constant stream of great content or with user generated comment vis-a-vis threads and conversations.

Content Marketing is Best

Blogging, or content marketing, remains the most important marketing strategy for your medical practice or small business.  While many businesses promote their use of a social media marketing strategy, blogging remains #1 in terms of ROI, branding and value.

The success of content marketing can be easily measured.  Visitors, bounce rate, comments, click through rates are all metrics showing the likes and needs of your patients, your customers.

The expense of time spent on a social media campaign is less tangible perhaps only because social media efforts ultimately draw attention to a great website that is “under construction.”

Value, Dedication, Commitment

Your content provides your patients with value.  Your articles provide solutions (answers) to their health specific questions.  Moreover, your consistent writing also displays a level of dedication and commitment that sets you apart from your competitors.

Value is the key to any website, but by continued and consistant writing, your dedication and commitment turns you into an industry expert.

Your content also remains the key factor to obtaining great SEO…unmatched and immesurable with any social media campaign.

What Can You Do?

Develop a long range objectives for your practice, i.e. define your marketing goals.

Write articles consistently on topics related to your long range initiative (SEO best practice).

With time, your articles will begin to reach out to your patients, compelling them to write and leave comments.  Make sure to answer each of the comments in a timely manner, thus creating a dialogue.  This visible interaction and engagement is the heart and soul of a blog and will eclipse any social media based campaign with respect to ROI, branding and providing value to your patients.

Both content marketing and engaging your patients online present time challenges and require consistent and continued publications and responses.  

A great website, therefore, is never completed and, hence, is always “under construction.”

To Your Growth And Success!

Randy

Randall V. Wong, M.D.
Medical Website Optimization

www.MedicalMarketingEnterprises.com

Too Many Keywords: One Post = One Keyword

Using too many keywords in your article will dilute your message and hurt your SERP rankings.Your website articles should contain no more than 1 or 2 main ideas (aka topics, keywords).  Writing exhaustive reviews on every post to show off your expertise is an SEO mistake, it will prevent your webpages from ranking for any keyword.

Using too many keywords dilutes the main idea (and the actual relevance) of your article.

What is a Keyword?

A keyword may be the main idea, subject or topic of your article.  A patient will also type keywords into the search bar when “Googling” something on the Internet.

Each page or post of your website is indexed separately for just a few keywords. Each webpage (vs. website) can individually rank high on SERP for particular keywords.

It’s much more likely to get a single page of your site to rank for one or two keywords than to rank for several.

It’s as if too many keywords compete with each other.

What is Your Main Idea?

A similar problem occurs when medical practices place all their doctors on the same “About Us” page.   Just as one page can not rank for multiple keywords, one page with too many doctors will not rank well as no specific doctor can standout.

Most patients are looking for very specific doctor and will use specific keywords to filter their search.

For instance, my “About” page will rank well for searches containing the words “retina specialist in northern Virginia,” yet I won’t rank well when a patient is looking for a cataract surgeon or glaucoma specialist.

More Pages = More Rankings

Another advantage of “one post one keyword” is that you will have more pages to be indexed.  More indexed pages mean more visibility of your website!

For instance, in our doctor example, let’s have each doctor have her own “About” page instead of having one page for, say, 5 doctors.

There are now 5 pages that may be optimized and rank well for your practice versus 1!

What Can You Do?

Keep your copywriting limited.  If you can’t get all your ideas into the same article, write another article!  We recommend Scribe SEO to help with your writing and keyword analysis.  This simple plugin will take away most of the guess work with your writing.  It has been a great tool for me!

Articles focused on one main idea are also much easier to read for your patients.  If you are creating an “About” page for your business, create a separate page for each provider.  This way, you can customize the SEO for each doctor!

Articles should be straight forward, focused and written to answer/inform quickly.  SEO is easiest if optimizing for one or two keywords.  Your article has a better chance of rising to the top!

To your success!

“Randy”

Randall V. Wong, M.D.
Medical Website Optimization
www.MedicalMarketingEnterprises.com

Writing in the First Person

Write medical copywrite in the point of view of the first person.Me, myself and I.

Using these 3 words allows you to create great copywrite your blog posts, and especially your ABOUT page, from the point of view of the “first person.”

Too often, websites are written in the point of view of the third person.  Effective, quality writing for your website should be written in the first person to effectively and immediately involve the reader.

Example A (1st):   During my free time, I enjoy playing competitive tennis and managing youth ice hockey.  I really enjoy…

versus

Example B (3rd):  Dr. Wong enjoys playing competitive tennis and managing youth ice hockey during his free time.  He really enjoys…

The First Person Involves the Reader

Write as though you are speaking directly to a single reader.  Write as though you are having a private conversation with a patient; i.e., your reader or customer.

When I write, I pretend I am writing to one person, one patient, or one client.

Writing in the first person naturally reaches out and draws in the reader.  You should be writing as if you are speaking directly to the reader.  As a result, the reader becomes part of the conversation.

The reader, therefore, naturally feels you are are speaking directly to her.

The Power of First Person

First person makes you the authority.  The first person point of view allows you, the doctor/author, to personally answer your reader’s questions.

Your readers want to hear what you have to say and not a narrator writing a story in the third person.  Writing in the first person naturally gives you more credibility and authority as you are speaking directly to them…and from you!

First person also allows you to be transparent…showing off your qualities as a human and how you function as a small business.

What is the Third Person?

The third person point of view (he, she, it) is best exemplified by news reporters.  In this situation, an actual 3rd person, the reporter, is conveying facts, or the news.  By remaining outside of the story, the news reporter gains credibility for his observational skills.

The reporting style, the 3rd person point of view, is too sterile as it neither includes you nor your reader.

What Can You Do?

First and foremost  always remember your goal in writing is to connect you with your readers.

Here’s a check for you:

Go to  your about page.  Does it look like a copy of your curriculum vitae.  If it does, rewrite it in the first person using words such as;  Me, Myself, I and You (involve the reader).

In addition to restating your professional and academic accolades it is also important to tell your readers who you are as a person.   One of the primary reasons for blogging is to make a personal connection with your readers.  In your writing it is important to tell your readers what you are, but it is much more important that your readers get a feel for who you are.  By doing this you will have forged a personal connection with your readers and that is priceless.   If you want a true return on the investment of time you are putting in to writing your blog articles you need to write in first person.

To your success!

Randy